Sitting on the front porch, it is not too hard to imagine the ranks of the Union and Confederate armies as they moved north and south towards Fredericksburg or Gettysburg along a dirt Lucketts Road. We know of no direct actions that involve the house or barns, or historically notable guests, but the fact that main barn remains standing is a rarity among period structures, as most were burned to the ground in the hopes of discouraging support for Col Mosby’s Raiders, who were very active in the Lucketts area. In fact, Col Mosby planned the attack on Union forces at Point of Rocks in a home just down the road. Also interesting is the fact that the bricks were all handmade from clay quarried on the original property.


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Farm History

When what is now Faith Like A Mustard Seed Farm was originally built in the 1840's, the property encompassed some 3,500 acres, from Noland’s Ferry and the Potomac River to the east, to what is now RT 15 to the west. The two lane road in front of the farm - Lucketts Road – is the original

Carolina Road, which started out as an Indian trail and became the primary inland north-south road of the pre-Civil War period, at the foot of the first ridge of the Blue Ridge Mountains. The Carolina Road stretched from North Carolina, across the Potomac to Frederick where it intersected with other early thoroughfares.